natrelle

A Noticeable Disadvantage of the Armpit Incision for Breast Augmentation

The armpit incision for a breast enlargement, also known as the axillary approach, is fairly popular for a variety of reasons including the desire for some women not to have a scar situated directly on their breast. This preference can work as a double edged sword, though. If the ultimate scar that remains is not aesthetically ideal – inconspicuous – then its presence can be quite problematic and exposed for the world to see. This could then limit a woman’s options regarding certain clothing styles, for example, sleeveless tops.

My preference most of the time for the incision in breast augmentation is the inframammary one which lies along the crease at the bottom of the breast. It has numerous advantages over both the transaxillary and periareolar locations which can be discussed at the time of your consultation.

The patient whose underarm scar is shown in the photo, had her breast augmentation surgery performed elsewhere using the transaxillary incision. She developed thick hypertophric scars postoperatively which her plastic surgeon excised but they recurred. The problems that she faces now are scars which are prominent and visible when she wears sleeveless tops, gowns and bathing suits and which are occasionally associated with discomfort particularly when reaching.

Exposed keloid that resulted from a transaxillary incision in a breast augmentation. This already had been revised once by her original plastic surgeon.

If these same scars had been situated on her breasts, they would at least be covered by her clothes and not be so visible to others. As a result, she has to be very selective with the clothes that she wears including avoiding sleeveless tops which can make enduring Arizona summers with temperatures far in excess of 100 degrees Fahrenheit less tolerable.

For more information on breast augmentations, breast revision surgery or on any other plastic surgery procedure that I perform or if you would like to schedule a complimentary consultation, please call my office at 480-451-3000.

Steven H. Turkeltaub, M.D. P.C.
Scottsdale and Phoenix, Arizona